Frequently Asked Questions

Does this phenomenon pose a health hazard to me, my children, or pets?

This is undetermined at this time. DHH has not identified data suggesting an imminent or chronic health hazard at this time. DHH is working with federal agencies and other states and will continue to review all available data to help determine a more definitive answer to this question.

Is there a known remedy to deal with suspect drywall emissions?

DHH is not currently aware of any proven, complete method of effective remediation of emissions. Claims of treatment involving ozone, coatings, and air cleaners should be scrutinized for evidence of proven effectiveness. DHH recommends against the use of ozone generators in occupied spaces, because ozone is a highly reactive and irritating molecule and is considered hazardous to people and pets.

See the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency report "Ozone Generators That Are Sold as Air Cleaners".

Who do I call if I have health questions?

If you have health questions, you should contact your physician first. We also ask you to report your concerns through our health survey. More than 300 Louisianans have participated in the department’s health survey as of June 15. Participation helps us to identify the scale and the spread of the problem, and will help our federal partners identify the best resources to apply to any potential solution. To join our survey, call DHH’s Indoor Air Quality hotline at (225) 342-8303 or 1-888-293-7020.

Who do I call if I wish to file a complaint?

Will DHH sample and test my home for corrosive gasses or for the presence of Chinese drywall?

No. Based on results reported by homeowners to DHH's Indoor Air Quality hotline, the department identified and visited 11 homes in May 2009 to conduct visual inspections and confirm reported conditions. The visits led to follow-up inspections in five homes by the U.S. EPA, which collected air samples and samples of drywall. At this time, DHH does not have the necessary resources to visit additional homes and collect air or material samples for analysis, however, additional guidance and some in-depth testing from the EPA is expected.

You and your contractor should also contact the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality for guidance in disposal of removed/used drywall.